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Are the rights of workers and the gig economy about to change?

View profile for Chris Amys
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The media has been reporting that workers are to receive new employment rights as a result of the Government’s response to the Taylor Review.

Last year, the independent Taylor Review was published following a review of modern working practices, especially businesses and individuals operating in the gig economy after cases involving Uber and Deliveroo.

A number of recommendations were made by its author Matthew Taylor, Chief Executive of the Royal Society of Arts, namely to address the uncertainties and issues raised in the growing number of Employment Tribunal claims in recent years, such as employment status, holiday entitlement and pay.

But is the Government’s response going to make any difference? Not at the moment as no changes in law have been announced although it is clear the Government has accepted most of the recommendations from the Taylor Review.

In the meantime, the Government has announced it will launch the following consultations to consider how to implement these thoughts and ideas into law:

  • Enforcement of employment rights
  • Agency workers
  • Measures to increase transparency in the UK labour market
  • Employment status

One view of the Government’s response is that it could make a significant different to the lives of workers in the gig economy. It is for this reason the Government may have decided not to make any significant announcements without further consultation, as the changes could be the biggest change to employment law in recent years.

However, as a number of unions have stated, there is little in the way of substance in the Government’s announcement, especially in relation to what and how employment law will be reformed. As no dates have been announced, it is possible we will see no changes for the next couple of years.

For more information about the gig economy and issues surrounding employment status, holiday entitlement and pay, contact Sally Morris on 01905 610410 or email sally.morris@mfgsolicitors.com.

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